Politics Rundown: Biden extends pause on student loans

The Biden Administration and Supreme Court move forward with new policies.

Caleb Jonker, News Editor

STUDENT LOAN EXTENSION 

On Aug. 6, the Biden Administration announced that the Department of Education will maintain a hold on federal student loans until Jan. 31, 2022. The press release stated this will be the last extension of the moratorium on student loans. Through the extension, President Biden aims to give the Department of Education ample time to prepare for the continuation of student loan payments. The release cited less loan defaults as one of the additional goals of the extension.

According to The New York Times, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York said that the pause on student loans saved borrowers an estimated $7 billion a month.

DECLASSIFICATION 

In an executive order from Sept. 3, the Biden Administration ordered the declassification of documents pertaining to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The order is meant to give American citizens access to previously classified information regarding the attacks. In the executive order, Biden stated that he values transparency. 

“Information should not remain classified when the public interest in disclosure outweighs any damage to the national security that might reasonably be expected from disclosure,” Biden said in the order.

Citing the importance of transparency, the executive order explained that the information will be declassified unless there is reason to keep certain information from the public. 

SUPREME COURT UPHOLDS ABORTION LAW

On Sept. 1, Texas law SB 8 went into effect. This law blocks abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detectable. According to NPR, this effectively blocks any abortions after six weeks. The article noted that many women do not know they are pregnant until after the six-week time frame. 

The law was challenged in court by Whole Woman’s Health. According to the Texas Tribune, after the cancellation of its hearing in the 5th Circuit Court, the case progressed into the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in favor of upholding the law late Wednesday night, according to NPR.

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