Fact of the Week: Fluor Fountain carries legacy of former AS president

The Flour Fountain was completed in 2003 in honor of Marjorie Flour Moore’s late husband.

The+Flour+Fountain+construction+was+completed+in+2003%2C+it+was+built+with+the+hopes+of+creating+a+place+for+students+to+come+together.+%7C+Job+Ang%2FTHE+CHIMES

Mike Villa

The Flour Fountain construction was completed in 2003, it was built with the hopes of creating a place for students to come together. | Job Ang/THE CHIMES

Abbey Bennett, Writer

The Flour Fountain construction was completed in 2003, it was built with the hopes of creating a place for students to come together. | Job Ang/THE CHIMES

In 1999, an Associated Students president had a dream. In the place where the Fluor Fountain now stands, Tim Tucker wished for a student plaza — a place where students from all corners of the campus could come together. Tucker drew plans and discussed his ideas with the administration.

While his ideas were widely accepted, there was only enough money for a tree to stand in the middle of the plaza, according to Ken Bascom, senior director of facilities planning and construction.

One of the most unique aspects of Tucker’s plan was to include a compass on the ground.

“This was to show there was a world outside of Biola,” Bascom said.

In 2001, Marjorie Fluor Moore gave to the construction of the library. As Moore looked around the campus, she wanted to see a fountain built in honor of her late husband, owner of Fluor Construction. The fountain, as we see it today, was completed in 2003.

“In the early years of existence [the fountain] was controversial,” Bascom said. “People said it was ugly and too much money.”

However, today the fountain daily fulfills the dream that Tucker had, as many students study and hang out on the plaza.

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